On a Jetty by the Bay: The Wave Organ Sculpture

on a jetty by the bay

 

I arrived at high tide, positioned myself next to one of the listening tubes and waited for it to deliver the sounds of the waves from below. Nothing. I tried another tube, again, nothing. This acoustic sculpture just didn’t work for me! Still, I found inspiration here (bodies of water work wonders for my creative process!) and did a couple of quick sketches in pen. Two of them are included here.
For more on The Wave Organ, see, Acoustic Sculpture by the San Francisco Bay.

Feeding the Soil: Dig, No Dig Gardening

silent hareFor years I’ve been trying to get my hands on Esther Dean’s, “No Dig Gardening” book. I finally located it via the Internet in Esther’s home country of Australia. The shipping cost was exorbitant so I never ordered it. Then it recently showed up on Amazon. Whuu huu!

If you are interested in the concept of no dig gardening, you can watch this 6-minute video about the process. I’ve also included a  link to the gardener, Charles Dowding’s site, Home Acres in England.

My Problem/Not My Problem … To Fix

In this two minute video, an MFA student makes a very wry observation about problems. You can watch it here. This statement is fraught with meaning — meaning about art, about life, about how you go about defining your place in this world.

Palette Scrapings

This post is part of a series on the current 2015 MFA Thesis Exhibition. Each post is authored by a graduate of Washington University’s Graduate School of Art in the Sam Fox School of Design & Visual Arts. An interview with Addoley Dzegede is also featured in Class Acts.

Foundations

founˈdāSH(ə)n/

noun
plural noun: foundations

  1. the lowest load-bearing part of a building, typically below ground level.
  1. an underlying basis or principle for something.

foundations_door.jpgI start with the beginning because it is the basis. I start with a foundation because of all that it may mean to you, and all that it means to me. It is something to build on, and something worth building. And then I pluralize it because there is no single source. There are multiple ways to tell the story. Foundations is meant to engage you in a process of discovery, but if you look behind…

View original post 625 more words

Lois Dodd: Painting the Ordinary World Around Her

Snow, Tree, Window
One of my favorite Lois Dodd pieces is “Snow, Tree, Window,” 2014. It is so quiet in its simplicity.

One of my favorite living landscape painters is Lois Dodd. I first learned about her through her affiliation with Cooper Union. Now 80-years old, Dodd still delights in the ordinary. Catch her New York show if you can. It runs through April 4th.

Photo credit: Alexandre Gallery

Foggy, Windy, Point Reyes National Seashore

4 lighthouse Point Reyes
Point Reyes Lighthouse, view from one of the 300+ steps leading down, down down
Point Reyes National Seashore

Here is a wild, windy, foggy side of California. The lighthouse at Point Reyes is closed when it gets too windy. This part of California is said to be the windiest, foggiest area in all of the Pacific. It is also a great place to whale watch. When I visited several days ago, I saw grey whales (in the waters below the lighthouse), elephant seals (at Drake’s Beach and Chimney Rock), birds (everywhere!), native wildflowers (along the Chimney Rock Trail) and tule elk (down by Drake’s Beach and out by Tomales Bay). What a trip!

5 light house point reyes #2
Finally, an upright photo of the lighthouse. Still foggy though.
 Jamaican Connection

An old name from my Jamaican history books surfaced here; it is that of the old English buccaneer (pirate), Francis Drake. Drakes’ Beach, where I saw elephant seals, and Sir Francis Drake Boulevard, the main thoroughfare leading into Point Reyes, are named for him. I wonder, do they know here in California, that he was an old pirate and slave trader and not simply, “the English explorer who landed off the Point Reyes coast and claimed California for the Queen?”

EARLY COAST GUARD HISTORY

Check out the Chimney Rock section of Point Reyes Seashore to learn about America’s early Coast Guard program. You can also see elephant seals here. If it is a nice enough day and the fog lifts, you can see the Farallon Islands from the tip of the Chimney Rock Trail. (You will also see a lot of birds and wildflowers here.)

2 boat house pont reyes
Historic Life Boat Station at Chimney Rock

 

 

1-boat dock at Point Reyes, looking towards Drake's Beach #2
Boat dock at Chimney Rock, looking towards Drakes’ Beach

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

tule elk2

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

I saw several tule elk down near Drake’s Beach and an entire herd crossing over the hills by Tomales Bay near sunset. (This sunset crossing may end up being translated into a painting!) You can learn about tule elk by watching this short video. Something I learned is that the tule elks’ mating behavior is very much like that of the elephant seals’. Who knew?

 

Charcoal Sachet — What is This?!

 

3b

I am continuing to teach myself to work with inks. This is just a doodle from my 2015 sketchbook. The paper, though of good quality, doesn’t allow me to completely capture the quiet energy of the piece. Still, it comes close, considering that this is just a doodle. Later on I will expand and expound on the subject matter on cold press paper (from either Strathmore or Arches). As of now the work is untitled but the three elements are a rosebud, an owl and several destroying angels (mushrooms) that I came across on a hike up on Russian Ridge, over by Skyline Boulevard and Alpine Road.

3I was thinking that maybe I could do the owl in charcoal, but am not sure yet. I may stick to using  inks only for this piece. Still, if you want to learn about the latest innovations in charcoal, watch this five-minute video about the charcoal sachet. I had no idea this thing existed, or that there were innovations in charcoal use! Thank you Rosemary & Company for introducing EdgePro and its products in your last newsletter.

 

Island of the Dead: New York City’s Hart Island

Panorama showing Hart Island (lower right) and City Island (left) in 2010. The large land mass at the top of the picture is the borough of the Bronx (Photo credit: wikipedia.org)

Unless you are a prisoner, you won’t have access to this island, at least for now. Hart Island is the story of what happens when an indigent or homeless New York City resident dies. This island has been used as the City’s potter’s field since 1869. Its grave diggers are the prisoners of Rikers Island.

***** ***** *****

 

Blog at WordPress.com.

Up ↑

%d bloggers like this: